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8 FOODS That BOOST Your LIBIDO & List of Foods That Lower/Destroy Your Libido

Black Raspberries

Both the berries and the seeds will transform your mind-set for getting in the mood, so pop in a handful a day to keep bedroom boredom at bay. “This phytochemical-rich food enhances both libido and sexual endurance,” say Drs. Anna Maria and Brian Clement, authors of 7 Keys to Lifelong Sexual Vitality and directors of Hippocrates Health Institute in West Palm Beach, Florida. Consume 10 black raspberries or a tablespoon of seeds a few hours before getting busy.

Broccoli

Raw, sautéed, or cooked, toss this vegetable in with your salad or alongside your steak for a bedroom boost. “I suggest it here because of the high vitamin C content,” says Keri Glassman, registered dietitian and author of The New You (and Improved) Diet. “Vitamin C aids in blood circulation to organs and has also been associated with an improved female libido.” If you’re going to pick a veggie at dinner anyway, may as well kill two birds with one sprout and make it this one.

Cloves

This sex superfood is versatile when it comes to cooking: it can be brewed in hot apple cider, infused in your favorite exotic dish, or added to a chai tea latte. Just make sure to share it with your guy, too. “In India, cloves have been used to treat male sexual dysfunction for centuries,” says Glassman. Research published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine agrees, discovering that clove extracts produced an increase in the sexual activity of normal male rats. “Cloves are also used to rid bad breath, which can’t hurt your kissing skills either,” says Glassman, who also suggests using powdered cloves in Mexican food. Add a little cumin and cinnamon and you’ve got a tasty, multifaceted aphrodisiac.

Figs

Want to be completely irresistible the next time your guy sees you? There’s a simple food solution that will have you two acting like teenagers again: Figs. “They’re considered excellent stimulants of fertility and enhance the secretion of pheromones,” say Drs. Clement. Feast on up to five figs before getting it on and find out for yourself.

Watermelon

Chocolate has the reputation of being the age-old aphrodisiac for the sweet lover, but researchers at the University of Guelph in Canada found that this is most likely just a mirage. Though ingredients like phenylethylamine in chocolate may boost serotonin and endorphin levels, there is no link between chocolate and improve sexual performance or arousal. So if you’re really looking for a sweet libido-booster, stick to a slice of watermelon. Although it’s 92 percent water, that remaining 8 percent of fruit is jam-packed with vital nutrients for sexual health. Researchers at the Texas A&M Fruit and Vegetable Improvement Center reported finding in 2008 that watermelon has ingredients that delivered Viagra-like effects to the human body’s blood vessels and could even aid in increasing libido. “Watermelon contains a phytonutrient called citrulline, which the body converts to arginine, an amino acid that boosts nitric oxide levels in the body, which relax blood vessels in the same way a medicine like Viagra does,” say Drs. Clement.

Ginseng

Researchers at the University of Hawaii found that women who took a ginseng supplement significantly upped their libido in a month, and 68 percent also said their overall sex life improved dramatically. “Add ginseng into your diet or try one of the many ginseng teas available,” Glassman says. “Just don’t jump at the sight of ginseng, though. Many energy drinks that claim to have ginseng in them also contain chemicals and tons of sugar, and there’s nothing sexy about that.”

Lettuce

A small salad with oil and vinegar as dressing will help your waistline and rev your sex drive. “Iceberg lettuce contains an opiate that helps to activate sex hormones,” say Drs. Clement. Nosh on a bowl at dinner and you’ll be ready to go by the time you turn in for the night.

Ginger

“King Henry VII and the ancient Asians were astute when using ginger for medicinal purposes,” say Drs. Clement. “In the 21st century, those of us who know about botanical-ceuticals know that ginger helps circulation temperature adjustment, mucoid detoxification (mucus-like residue that can coat your GI tract) and also a libido enhancer.” Whether raw, in supplement form, or added to your favorite recipe or drink, ginger also lends itself to defense against winter’s hard cold and flu season. Because trying to get frisky with a runny nose never ends well.

Libido Killer: Oysters

Oysters have been dubbed as the king of libido boosters, but don’t buy into all the hype. “Oysters are a well-known source of zinc, which plays a central role in the creation of hormones and clitoris sensitivity, but they are also a toxic food,” Drs. Clement say. “Oysters and other shellfish can absorb the toxins and parasites in the ocean, which can often outweigh the benefits of zinc.” Skip the seafood and chow down on spinach for a similar low-calorie, high-zinc option.

Libido Killer: Processed Baked Goods

Yet another reason to avoid sugar-loaded treats: They will zap your sex drive. “Baked goods contain saturated trans fats that wreak havoc on human cells, including the immune system,” say Drs. Clement. “They surround the cells, coagulating them so that vital food glucose can’t be absorbed and remains in the blood, raising blood sugar and lowering libido. The fats also clog ventricles, reducing oxygen to sexual organs, and prevent the spleen from producing enough white blood cells, so eggs and sperm have difficulty multiplying.” Yikes!

Libido Killer: Dairy

Ice cream and cream cheese addicts may want to switch to a lactose-free alternative once in a while. The Clements say that the lactic acid in dairy and oxygen-destroying elements can squash a libido at any level, so try to limit the creamy stuff to three times per week. But don’t forget dairy’s best benefit: Calcium. It’s linked to cell and sexual health. When cells are healthy, they increase sensitivity for better circulation to genitalia, thus giving you more pleasure. Stock up on calcium-rich soymilk, leafy greens, sprouted beans, cabbage, broccoli, and wheatgrass juice.

Originally published by FitnessMagazine.com

Foods That Are Destroying Your Libido

By: Anna Fleet

A bout of lowered sex drive happens to us all…every now and again. However, if “I’m not in the mood, honey” is your constant response night after night, week after week, believe me when I say you should be concerned with more than the frustrations of your partner or spouse.

 Look first to your diet for the major culprit behind your decreased sex drive.  What you’re putting in your mouth throughout the day can virtually drain your libido. Why?

 Because diet directly impacts your hormone levels, particularly your testosterone, the hormone that puts the mojo in your moves, the funky in your monkey, and the tang in your…well, you get the picture. The food you eat directly influences sexual desire and helps puts you in the mood for love (cue the Barry White).

1. Alcohol

Sure, some people drink a glass of wine or share a bottle to get in the mood. However, too much alcohol will actually quash your sexual prowess. So while a little booze may decrease your psychological inhibitions while increasing your need for love—in the end alcohol is a depressant that can negatively impact your body’s ability to perform sexually. That’s why, if you drink too much; you will reduce your testosterone production and your libido.

2. Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners, like aspartame, are great if you’re trying to cut out sugar and lose weight. But before you reach for that diet soda keep in mind that the fake sweet stuff also inhibits the neuro-production of dopamine and serotonin (your feel good hormone), leading to much less sexy feelings of depression, irritability, and lowered libido. Instead, reach for natural sweeteners, like honey.

3.Coffee

Oh you coffee addicts might think your morning, lunch, and late afternoon pick-me-up puts more peep in your step. However, too much coffee keeps your adrenal glands working and can lead to an overproduction of stress hormones. Over the long term, energy and sex drive will suffer—a good reason to keep it at 2 cups a day and to stop slurping caffeine in the evenings.

4.Cheese

Do you eat a lot of cheese? Have you noticed you are a bit irritable? The truth is that most store-bought, cow’s milk cheeses are processed using a mix of antibiotics and growth hormones, which can mess up the body’s natural production of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone—the primary hormones associated with sex drive. If you’re a cheese addict; try a non-cow’s milk cheese instead.

5.Canola Oil

Vegetable oils, like canola oil, are high in unsaturated fats. And while some fat is healthy for us, too much leaves the body open to free radicals and oxidative stress, limiting both sex drive and conception in women.  Mix up your cooking oils with a combination of peanut, olive oil, and even coconut oil to prevent reproductive damage.

6.Potato Chips

Likewise, the consumption of too many trans-fats, the so-called worst fats, like those used to prepare bagged potato chips and processed snacks will cause oxidative damage to the body, causing disruptions to healthy hormone regulation—leading to weight gain, fatigue, and plummeting libido.

7.Canned Foods

Sodium is your libidos worst nightmare—for one it restricts blood flow to certain essential parts of the body needed for arousal (look down); while secondly, excess sodium can damage the mineralocorticoid hormones (i.e., aldosterone), which regulate sex hormones and sex drive.

8.Red Meat

If you enjoy a nice, lean cut of steak every few weeks, your lusty loins are probably safe. However, if you consume red meat regularly, you’re consuming excess growth hormones, fat, and antibiotics, which will upset the natural production of semen, sweat, and testosterone—particularly in men. Instead, guys should chow down on leaner cuts of beef round, beef loin, or filet mignon.

5 foods that lower your libido

Some foods that you eat regularly could be affecting your levels of sexual desire. Here’s what to avoid if you’re planning a steamy evening

1. Liquorice

This sugary plant is often used to make candies as well as some herbal teas and other beverages. The liquorice plant contains phytoestrogens and has been shown to affect the endocrine system. Consumption of liquorice has been linked to lower levels of testosterone, a hormone present in both men and women that strengthens sexual desire.

2. Soy

Soy beans are very rich in a number of nutrients including protein and vitamins A and B. They can be found in various forms: soy milk, tofu, tempeh, natto, miso, shoyu and tamari, as well as in many processed foods. Eaten in excessive quantity, soy can also lower testosterone levels.

3. Mint

Mint is one of the most well-known medicinal plants. It benefits the digestive system and has antiseptic, tonic and stimulating properties. But it can also have repercussions for the libido. Brush your teeth rather than eating a breath mint!

4. Quinine

Quinine, used as a flavouring agent in tonic water and some other beverages, is naturally derived from the bark of the cinchona tree and has been used for centuries for its anti-malarial properties. Unfortunately, it has also been linked to sexual function, so think twice before overdoing the gin and tonics.

5. Corn Flakes

If you’re planning breakfast in bed, avoid corn flakes. Developed by Seventh-Day Adventists including Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, the breakfast cereal was intended as part of a bland diet that would lower people’s sex drives.

 courtesy of besthealthmag.ca

You should also consider fueling up with so-called “super foods” to keep your energy up and stress level down.

7 Superfoods to Boost Energy Levels

1. Salmon

Why it’s so special: This fish contains high levels of omega 3 fatty acids, linked to decreased rates of heart disease.

How it helps energize you: Salmon is a good source of protein, which can help improve your alertness and performance.

2. Almonds: Help Curb Cravings

How it helps energize you: Almonds prevent spikes in blood sugar and insulin, which means fewer highs and lows while you’re working.

3. Green Tea: Healthy Coffee Alternative

How it helps energize you: 

Green tea is loaded with antioxidants and catechins, compounds that may help reduce the risk of heart disease. A smart choice for a midafternoon pick-me-up.

4. Avocado: Improve Your Concentration

How it helps energize you: The dual fiber and fat in this summertime favorite help keep insulin levels steady, making concentration easier. Beneficial for their good fat, avocadoes contain plenty of potassium.

5. Veggies: Avoid a Blood Sugar Crash

How it helps energize you: The fiber in these crunchy vegetables helps stabilize blood sugar and insulin, preventing energy levels from rising rapidly only to crash down.

6. Dark Chocolate: Lower Stress

How it helps energize you: Eating dark chocolate may lower cortisol, a stress hormone associated with increased appetite and weight gain. The flavonoids in dark chocolate help keep blood vessels healthy and reduce inflammation. In addition, the fat in dark chocolate won’t adversely affect your cholesterol levels.(70 percent or more)

7. Berries: Keep You Focused

How it helps energize you: Packed with fiber, berries can keep you focused by controlling your blood sugar levels and helping you avoid a dip in energy. Dark berries, including blueberries, raspberries and blackberries, are packed with antioxidants.

The Anti-Cancer Green Juice!

The Anti-Cancer Green Juice!

 

You’re free to eat whatever you want, however, a whole foods diet is recommended over heavily processed and fried foods. The juice recipes created, will offer many health benefits, including weight loss,  anti-inflammation, increased energy and a natural boost to immunity.

Day 1: Pineapple Jalapeno

2 Cups Pineapple

5 kale Leaves

1 Cucumber

½ – 1 Jalapeno (use ½ a jalapeno if you don’t want it to spicy

Day 2: Simply Green

5 Handfuls of Spinach

3 Kale Leaves

3 Celery Stalks

½ Cucumber

½ Lemon

2 Fuji Apples

  Day 3: Green Detox

½ Head of Romaine

1 Handful of Spinach

2 Kale Leaves

10 Sprigs of Cilantro

2 Apples (Fuji or Granny Smith)

½ Lime

Day 4: Pineapple Kale Cucumber

1 Cucumber

1 Granny Smith Apple (Green)

½ Cup of Pineapple

4 Kale Leaves

3 Swiss Chard Leaves

Day 5: Green Citrus

1 Orange

½ Cucumber

3 Celery Stalks

½ Lemon

1 Fuji Apple

Day 6: Pineapple Mint

2 Handfuls of Spinach

4 Kale Leaves

1 Cup Pineapple

1 Small Handful of Mint Leaves

2 Granny Smith Apples (Green)

Day 7:Green Detox

1 Bunch Cilantro

2 Cucumbers

2 Green Apples

1 Lime

Bonus Libido Booster

1 Organic Cucumber

500`750 ml of spring water

2 tblspoons of Ashwaganda root powder

2 tblspoons of Black Maca Powder

1 ripe yellow banana

*Slice cucumber, place in a glass container (500`1 litre) of spring water and leave overnight(or 8hours) in refridgerator. take water(with/without cucumber), then add rest of the ingredients. Blend and enjoy!

Foods That Help Reduce Anxiety

Eat to Beat Stress: Foods That Reduce Anxiety

Here’s some good news to keep in mind the next time you’re stressed out: Eating may be a stay-calm trick. We’re not talking about stuffing yourself with your typical go-to comfort food, such as mac and cheese or French fries, because that will only leave you feeling guilty and even more anxious. Instead, feed your face with one (or more) of these 10 superfoods to feel at ease fast.

Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of potassium, which helps regulate electrolyte balance and manage blood pressure.

Eating potassium-rich foods such, as pumpkin seeds or bananas, may help reduce symptoms ofstress and anxiety.

Pumpkin seeds are also a good source of the mineral zinc. One study carried out on 100 female high school students found that zinc deficiency may negatively affect mood.

Zinc is essential for brain and nerve development. The largest storage sites of zinc in the body are in the brain regions involved with emotions.

 Asparagus 

Depression has been linked to low levels of folic acid, and one vegetable that boosts this mood-enhancing nutrient is asparagus. A single cup provides two-thirds of your daily value, and it’s easy to fit asparagus into almost any meal. Some ideas: Sauté some asparagus tips for a tasty omelet. Go with steamed or grilled spears as a side vegetable for meat, fish or poultry. Snack on some steamed spears by dipping in some dressing.

 Avocado 

We need B vitamins for healthy nerves and brain cells, and feelings of anxiety may be rooted in a B vitamin deficiency. Avocados are rich in stress-relieving B vitamins. Bonus: They’re also high in monounsaturated fat and potassium, which help lower blood pressure. Next time stress has you reaching for a pint of full-fat ice cream, opt for a non-dairy DIY version made with avocado blended with a ripe banana, vanilla extract, nut milk, and nonnutritive sweetener. Freeze, then chill-out.

Dark chocolate

Experts have long suspected that dark chocolate might help reduce stress and anxiety. A 2014 study found that 40g of dark chocolate helped reduce perceived stress in female students.

Other studies have generally found that dark chocolate or cocoa may improve mood. However, many of these studies are observational, so the results need to be interpreted with caution.

Although it is still unclear how dark chocolate reduces stress, it is a rich source of polyphenols, especially flavonoids. One study suggested thatflavonoids might reduce neuroinflammation and cell death in the brain as well as improve blood flow.

Chocolate has a high tryptophan content, which the body uses to turn into mood-enhancingneurotransmitters, such as serotonin in the brain.

Dark chocolate is also a good source of magnesium. Eating a diet with enough magnesium in it ortaking supplements may reduce symptoms of depression.

When choosing dark chocolate, aim for 70 percent or more. Dark chocolate still contains added sugars and fats, so a small serving of 1 to 3 grams (g) is appropriate.

Turmeric

Turmeric is a spice commonly used in Indian and South-East Asian cooking. The active ingredient in turmeric is called curcumin. Curcumin may help lower anxiety by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress that often increase in people experiencing mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression. A 2015 study found that curcumin reduced anxiety in obese adults.

Another study found that an increase of curcumin in the diet also increased DHA and reduced anxiety. Turmeric is easy to add to meals. It has minimal flavor, so goes well in smoothies, curries, and casserole dishes.

Blueberries

Blueberries may seem small, but just a handful pack a powerful punch of antioxidants and vitamin C, making them mighty stress-busters. When we’re stressed, our bodies need vitamin C and antioxidants to help repair and protect cells. While blueberries are tasty all by themselves (tip: freeze them for a cold berry snack), there’s no better way to boost the nutrition in a serving of yogurt or high-fiber cereal.

Green tea

Green tea contains an amino acid called theanine, which is receiving increasing scrutiny due to its potential effects on mood disorders. Theanine has anti-anxiety and calming effects and may increase the production of serotonin and dopamine.

A 2017 review found that 200 mg of theanine improved self-reported relaxation and calmness while reducing tension in human trials.

Green tea is easy to add to the day-to-day diet. It is a suitable replacement for soft drinks, coffee, and alcoholic beverages.

   

Almonds

Get some stress-relief munching on almonds, which are rich in vitamins B2 and E. Both of these nutrients help bolster the immune system during times of stress. Just a quarter cup of almonds each day does the trick. For variety, spread some almond butter on fruit slices or whole wheat crackers.

 Oranges

There’s a reason orange juice is said to be part of the breakfast of champions: Vitamin C is another vitamin known to lower blood pressure and the stress hormone cortisol. For a quick burst of vitamin C, simply eat a whole orange or drink a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice without added sugar.

Salmon

Put more fish on your dish to help you feel at ease. A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids helps keep cortisol and adrenaline from spiking when you’re feeling tense. Salmon is one of the very best sources of omega-3s: Consuming 4 ounces at least three times a week goes a long way towards protecting your heart when those stress hormones are surging.

Spinach

Make like Popeye and fill up on spinach. Leafy greens may not be your idea of comfort food, but spinach can have a comforting effect. Spinach is packed with magnesium, the mineral that helps regulate cortisol levels and promote feelings of wellbeing. A mere cup of spinach fills 40 percent of your daily quota, so slip some in with your morning eggs, swap for lettuce in your sandwich, have a salad, steam it as a side dish,or drop a handful of leaves into your soup.

Turkey 

That sleepy feeling you get after eating Thanksgiving dinner is due to the amino acid tryptophan found in turkey. Tryptophan signals the brain to release the feel-good chemical serotonin, which promotes calmness and even tiredness.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal is another food that helps get the calm-inducing hormone serotonin flowing. Go with thick-cut, old fashioned oats that require cooking instead of instant oatmeal. Why? Coarse oats are higher in fiber and so they take longer to digest (meaning their calming effect actually lasts longer).

The next time you feel overwhelmed, eat your way calm by putting these superfoods on your plate.

Other foods that may help

Eat a varied and balanced diet with high quality, nutrient-dense carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Aim for whole foods, vegetables, fruit, legumes, whole grains, lean meats, and especially fish. Other foods that may help include:

  • Turkey and other tryptophan-containing foods such as eggs, dark chocolate, cheese, pineapple, bananas, oats, and tofu.
  • Nuts, especially almonds are an excellent source of vitamin E. Vitamin E deficiency has been linked to mood disorders.
  • Chia seeds are also a good source of omega-3s.
  • Protein sources, such as lean meat, fish, nuts, and dairy all provide amino acids, which the body converts into the mood-lifting neurotransmitters, such as serotonin.
  • Spinach and Swiss chard are both high in magnesium.
  • Cinnamon provides anti-inflammatory properties

Evidence increasingly shows that diets high in processed foods can increase anxiety.

 

Ketogenic Diet:What to Eat and Avoid

What to Eat and Avoid on the Ketogenic Diet: A Complete Food List and 7-Day Sample Menu

If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.

When you’re eating the foods that get you there (more on that in a minute), your body can enter a state of ketosis in one to three days, she adds. During the diet, the majority of calories you consume come from fat, with a little protein and very little carbohydrates. Ketosis also happens if you eat a very low-calorie diet — think doctor-supervised, only when medically recommended diets of 600 to 800 total calories.

The Potential Benefits and Risks of the Keto Diet

There are three instances where there’s research to back up a ketogenic diet, including to help control type 2 diabetes, as part of epilepsy treatment, or for weight loss, says Mattinson. “In terms of diabetes, there is some promising research showing that the ketogenic diet may improve glycemic control. It may cause a reduction in A1C — a key test for diabetes that measures a person’s average blood sugar control over two to three months — something that may help you reduce medication use,” she says.

One major downside to the ketogenic diet regarding diabetes is that you’re eating a lot of fat, and that fat may be saturated, which is unhealthy. Because people with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, there’s concern that the saturated fat in the diet may drive up LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol levels, and further increase the odds of heart problems. If you have type 2 diabetes, talk to your doctor before attempting a ketogenic diet. They may recommend a different weight-loss diet for you, like a reduced-calorie diet. Those with epilepsy should also consult their doctor before using this as part of their treatment plan.

In terms of weight loss, you may be interested in trying the ketogenic diet because you’ve heard that it can make a big impact right away. And that’s true. “Ketogenic diets will cause you to lose weight within the first week,” says Mattinson. She explains that your body will first use up all of its glycogen stores (the storage form of carbohydrate). With depleted glycogen, you’ll drop water weight. While it can be motivating to see the number on the scale go down (often dramatically), do keep in mind that most of this is water loss initially.

But the keto diet can be effective over time. One review suggested the keto diet can spur fat loss in obese people when used for a couple of weeks and up to one year. A meta-analysis noted that one reason for weight loss is likely that keto diets suppress hunger.

The downside to a ketogenic diet for weight loss is the difficulty maintaining it. “Studies show that weight loss results from being on a low-carb diet for more than 12 months tend to be the same as being on a normal, healthy diet,” says Mattinson. While you may be eating more satiating fats (like peanut butter, regular butter, or avocado), you’re also way more limited in what’s allowed on the diet, which can make everyday situations, like eating dinner with family or going out with friends, far more difficult. Because people often find it tough to sustain, it’s easy to rely on it as a short-term diet rather than a long-term lifestyle.

Before starting, ask yourself what is really realistic for you, Mattinson suggests. Then get your doctor’s okay. You may also work with a local registered dietitian nutritionist to limit potential nutrient deficiencies and talk about vitamin supplementation, as you won’t be eating whole grains, dairy, or fruit, and will eliminate many veggies. “A diet that eliminates entire food groups is a red flag to me. This isn’t something to take lightly or dive into headfirst with no medical supervision,” she says.

What to Keep in Mind When Creating Your Ketogenic Meal Plan

If you’ve decided to move forward in trying the keto diet, you will want to stick to the parameters of the eating plan. Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your calories will come from fats. That means you’ll eat meats, fats, and oils, and a very limited amount of nonstarchy vegetables, she says. (This is different from a traditional low-carb diet, as even fewer carbs are allowed on the keto diet.)

The remaining calories in the keto diet come from protein — about 1 gram (g) per kilogram of body weight, so a 140-pound woman would need about 64 g of protein total. As for carbs: “Every body is different, but most people maintain ketosis with between 20 and 50 g of net carbs per day,” says Mattinson. Total carbohydrates minus fiber equals net carbs, she explains.

One thing to remember: “It’s easy to get ‘kicked out’ of ketosis,” says Mattinson. Meaning, if you eat something as small as a serving of blueberries, your body could revert to burning carbohydrates for fuel rather than fat.

 

Wondering what fits into a keto diet — and what doesn’t? “It’s so important to know what foods you’ll be eating before you start, and how to incorporate more fats into your diet,” says Kristen Mancinelli, RD, author of The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss, who is based in New York City. We asked her for some guidelines.

Protein

Liberally: (That said, ketogenic diets aren’t high in protein, they focus on fat, so these should all be consumed in moderation.)

  • Grass-fed beef
  • Fish, especially fatty fish, like salmon
  • Dark meat chicken

Occasionally:

  • Bacon
  • Low-fat proteins, like skinless chicken breast and shrimp. These are great to include in your keto diet, but add a sauce on top for some fat rather than eating plain.

Never:

  • Cold cuts with added sugar (read the label!)
  • Meat that has been marinated in sugary sauces
  • Fish or chicken nuggets

Oil and Fat

Liberally:

  • Avocado oil
  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Butter
  • Heavy cream

Occasionally: (Limit your consumption, which should be easy to do when avoiding packaged foods, which these are often found in.)

  • Sunflower oil
  • Safflower oil
  • Corn oil

Never:

  • Margarine
  • Artificial trans fats

Fruits and Veggies

Liberally:

  • Avocado
  • Leafy greens, like spinach and arugula
  • Celery
  • Asparagus

Occasionally: (These are still great choices, but you’ll also need to count these carbs.)

  • Leeks
  • Spaghetti squash
  • Eggplant

Never:

  • Potatoes
  • Corn
  • Raisins

Nuts and Seeds

Liberally:

  • Walnuts
  • Almonds
  • Flax and chia seeds

Occasionally:

  • Unsweetened nut butters (almond or peanut butter)
  • Cashews
  • Pistachios

Never:

  • Trail mixes with dried fruit
  • Sweetened nut or seed butters
  • Chocolate-covered nuts

Dairy Products

Liberally:

  • Cheddar cheese
  • Blue cheese
  • Feta cheese

Occasionally:

  • Full-fat cottage cheese
  • Full-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • Full-fat ricotta cheese

Never:

  • Milk
  • Sweetened nonfat yogurt
  • Ice cream

Sweeteners

Liberally: Practice moderation with sweeteners.

Occasionally:

  • Stevia
  • Erythritol
  • Xylitol

Never:

  • Agave
  • Honey
  • Maple syrup
  • White and brown sugars

Condiments and Sauces

Liberally:

  • Guacamole
  • Lemon butter sauce
  • Mayonnaise (ensure there’s no sugar added)

Occasionally:

  • Raw garlic
  • Tomato sauce (look for those with no added sugar)
  • Balsamic vinegar

Never:

  • Barbecue sauce
  • Ketchup
  • Honey mustard

Drinks

Liberally:

  • Water
  • Almond milk
  • Bone broth
  • Plain tea

Occasionally:

  • Black coffee (watch caffeine consumption)
  • Unsweetened carbonated water (limit only if bubbles make you bloated)
  • Zero-calorie drinks

Never:

  • Soda
  • Fruit juice
  • Lemonade

Herbs and Spices

Liberally: (All herbs and spices fit in a keto diet, but if you’re using large amounts, Mancinelli recommends counting the carbs.)

  • Salt (salt foods to taste)
  • Pepper
  • Thyme, oregano, paprika, and cayenne

Occasionally: (These are still great choices, but contain some carbs.)

  • Ground ginger
  • Garlic powder
  • Onion powder

Never:

  • Herbs and spices are generally okay to use in small amounts to add flavor to foods.

Supplements

Consider taking:

  • Fiber
  • Multivitamin

Optional: (These help you produce ketones more quickly, but Mancinelli says she has no opinion either way on recommending you take them or not.)

  • MCT oil
  • Exogenous ketones
A Detailed Ketogenic Diet Food List to Follow

Following are some of the best foods to eat on the keto diet, along with their serving sizes and an explanation of why they’re good for people following this eating approach.

Avocado Oil

Per 1 tablespoon (tbsp) serving: 124 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 14g fat

Benefits: This is a good source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fatty acids.

Canola Oil

Per 1 tbsp serving: 124 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 14g fat

Benefits: Research has shown that consumption of canola oil can reduce total and bad cholesterol.

Coconut Oil

Per 1 tbsp serving: 116 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 14g fat

Benefits: While high in saturated fat, coconut oil may increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels.

MCT Oil

Per 1 tbsp serving: 115 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 14g fat

Benefits: Derived from coconut, MCT stands for medium chain triglycerides. Limited research suggests MCT oil may aid in weight loss and help promote ketosis.

Butter

Per 1 tbsp serving: 100 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 11g fat

Benefits: Though the serving provides 11g of saturated fat, research has found that butter wasn’t a major factor in increasing risk of chronic conditions, like heart disease or diabetes.

Cheddar Cheese

Per 1 slice serving: 113 calories, 0g net carbs, 7g protein, 9g fat

Benefits: Cheese is allowed as you please, but cheddar is a good example of its nutrition stats. One study found that cheese eaters had a 12 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

Heavy Cream

Per 1 tbsp serving: 52 calories, 0g net carbs, 0g protein, 5g fat

Benefits: This is an easy way to add calories and fat into a ketogenic diet.

Bacon

Per 1 slice serving: 43 calories, 0g net carbs, 3g protein, 3g fat

Benefits: The green light on bacon may be one reason you’re up for sticking to the diet, as it can make eating occasions more palatable. Just watch the sodium content, as it can add up quickly.

Chicken Thigh

Per 1 thigh serving: 318 calories, 0g net carbs, 32g protein, 20g fat

Benefits: Leave the skin on here for extra fat. One thigh is a good source of selenium, zinc, and B vitamins.

Eggs

Per 1 egg serving: 77 calories, 1g net carbs, 6g protein, 5g fat

Benefits: Eggs contains the perfect duo of satiating protein and fat; they’re also high in the antioxidant mineral selenium.

Ground Beef

Per 3-ounce (oz) serving (measured raw): 279 calories, 0g net carbs, 12g protein, 24g fat

Benefits: Ground beef (made with 70 percent lean meat and 30 percent fat) is a higher-fat choice — but that’s the point here. You’ll also get an excellent source of vitamin B12, which is necessary to keep energy levels up.

New York Strip Steak

Per 3-oz serving: 224 calories, 0g net carbs, 22g protein, 14g fat

Benefits: You’ll get an impressive amount of muscle-building protein plus satiating fat in this option. It’s also rich in zinc, a mineral that promotes proper thyroid functioning.

Asparagus

Per 1 cup (raw) serving: 27 calories, 2g net carbs, 3g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Asparagus contains bone-building calcium, plus other minerals, such as potassium and magnesium, which has been linked with blood sugar regulation.

Avocado

Per ½ avocado serving: 160 calories, 2g net carbs, 2g protein, 15g fat

Benefits: The creamy fruits are packed with fiber, something that you may lack on the keto diet. They also are an excellent source of immune-revving vitamin C.

Bok Choy

Per 1 cup (shredded) serving: 9 calories, 1g net carbs, 1g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Chinese cabbage is a rich source of vitamins A and C, plus offers some calcium and energy-revving iron.

Cauliflower

Per 1 cup (raw) serving: 25 calories, 2g net carbs, 2g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Provides more than three-quarters of your vitamin C quota in a day; with 3 g of fiber, it’s also a good source of the heart-healthy nutrient.

Celery

Per 1 cup (raw) serving: 16 calories, 1g net carbs, 1g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Celery is one of the most hydrating veggies out there. These crunchy spears also contain vitamins A and K, and folate.

Cucumber

Per ½ cup (slices) serving: 8 calories, 2g net carbs, 0g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Cucumbers are high in water, making them a hydrating choice. They’re also a surprisingly good source of vitamin K, a vitamin important for proper blood clotting and bone formation.

Green Peppers

Per 1 cup (sliced) serving: 18 calories, 2g net carbs, 1g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Along with more than a day’s requirements for vitamin C, they’re also a good source of vitamin B6, which plays a role in more than 100 enzyme reactions in the body.

Lettuce

Per 1 cup (shredded) serving: 5 calories, 1g net carbs, 0g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Leafy greens can add bulk to your meals for very few calories, as well as skin-strengthening vitamins A and C.

Mushrooms

Per 1 cup (raw) serving: 15 calories, 1g net carbs, 2g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: Mushrooms are known for their potential immune-boosting properties, as one study suggested. They’re also an excellent source of B vitamins.

Zucchini

Per 1 cup (sliced, raw) serving: 18 calories, 3g net carbs, 1g protein, 0g fat

Benefits: This is a great way to sneak in additional fiber, and the veggie also offers a good source of manganese, a mineral that helps form bone and aids in blood sugar control.

A 7-Day Sample Menu for the Keto Diet

Day 1

Breakfast: Scrambled eggs in butter on a bed of lettuce topped with avocado

Snack: Sunflower seeds

Lunch: Spinach salad with grilled salmon

Snack: Celery and pepper strips dipped in guacamole

Dinner: Pork chop with cauliflower mash and red cabbage slaw

Day 2

Breakfast: Bulletproof coffee (made with butter and coconut oil), hard-boiled eggs

Snack: Macadamia nuts

Lunch: Tuna salad stuffed in tomatoes

Snack: Roast beef and sliced cheese roll-ups

Dinner: Meatballs on zucchini noodles, topped with cream sauce

Day 3

Breakfast: Cheese and veggie omelet topped with salsa

Snack: Plain, full-fat Greek yogurt topped with crushed pecans

Lunch: Sashimi takeout with miso soup

Snack: Smoothie made with almond milk, greens, almond butter, and protein powder

Dinner: Roasted chicken with asparagus and sautéed mushrooms

Day 4

Breakfast: Smoothie made with almond milk, greens, almond butter, and protein powder

Snack: Two hard-boiled eggs

Lunch: Chicken tenders made with almond flour on a bed of greens with cucumbers and goat cheese

Snack: Sliced cheese and bell pepper slices

Dinner: Grilled shrimp topped with a lemon butter sauce with a side of asparagus

Day 5

Breakfast: Fried eggs with bacon and a side of greens

Snack: A handful of walnuts with a quarter cup of berries

Lunch: Grass-fed burger in a lettuce “bun” topped with avocado and a side salad

Snack: Celery sticks dipped in almond butter

Dinner: Baked tofu with cauliflower rice, broccoli, and peppers, topped with a homemade peanut sauce

Day 6

Breakfast: Baked eggs in avocado cups

Snack: Kale chips

Lunch: Poached salmon avocado rolls wrapped in seaweed (rice-free)

Snack: Meat-based bar (turkey or pork)

Dinner: Grilled beef kabobs with peppers and sautéed broccolini

Day 7

Breakfast: Eggs scrambled with veggies, topped with salsa

Snack: Dried seaweed strips and cheese

Lunch: Sardine salad made with mayo in half an avocado

Snack: Turkey jerky (look for no added sugars)

Dinner: Broiled trout with butter, sautéed bok choy

Everyday Health

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Healthy Office Snacks(part 1)

Working eight or more hours a day can make it difficult to eat healthfully unless you plan ahead. Research shows that eating every four hours helps to keep your metabolism charged and your energy level high. Before you dig in your drawer for spare change and head to the vending machine, plan ahead and stash low-calorie, nutritious snacks in a cabinet, drawer, or your briefcase. Each of these snacks has less than 200 calories and are sure to satisfy when the 3 p.m. cravings hit.

Whole Wheat Crackers and Peanut Butter

Save your quarters by skipping the vending machine’s peanut butter crackers and packing your own nutritious snack. For a hunger-curbing option, try 10 multigrain wheat crackers (such as Multigrain Wheat Thins) and a tablespoon of peanut butter. This nutrient-rich snack rings in at just 193 calories and offers 2 grams of fiber. The combination of complex carbs and protein help to keep your blood sugar stable and keep you feeling full longer.

Fruit

fruitGrab an apple, banana, pear, grapes, or other portable fruit as you dash out the door every morning. If you grab a different fruit every day (and change with the seasons), you’ll obtain a good variety of nutrients plus fiber, and won’t get bored with the same old snack. The average serving of fruit is around 70 calories so pair with a cup of fat-free milk (about 90 calories) for a protein boost as well as extra calcium and vitamin D. This protein and fiber combination will keep you feeling full and prevent mindless eating.

Popcorn with Parmesan

Take regular bagged popcorn to the next level by topping with 2 tablespoons of shredded Parmesan cheese. The nutty flavor of the popcorn pairs well with the rich flavor of Parmesan resulting in a quick, 150-calorie snack. Simply top 3½ cups of 94%-fat-free popcorn with the cheese and your snack is served. If you don’t have an office fridge to stash your Parm, nosh on just the popcorn for only 100 calories. This salty snack counts as one of your three daily servings of whole grains and helps to increase your energy and mood.

Nuts

almonds-snackMake the swap and choose nuts over chips for a crunchy alternative. Nuts are rich in heart-healthy fats but are calorically dense (about 170 calories per ounce) so measure out an ounce (about 24 almonds) and stick to that amount instead of feasting on the entire bag. Stash premeasured baggies of nuts in an office drawer or in your purse to nibble on when the 3 p.m. hunger pains hit. Almonds and other nuts are a naturally high source of vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, and potassium and are rich in protein and fiber.

Instant Oatmeal

instant-oatmealWhen you’re in a rush at work and want something warm and comforting, heat a packet of plain instant oatmeal (just 110 calories) in the microwave for a quick and satisfying treat. Choose plain oatmeal and add your own flavorings to control the calorie and sugar content. Top with a 42 calorie mini box of raisins for a sweet flavor and added nutrients or sprinkle with cinnamon and nutmeg. Doubling as a fiber-rich breakfast or daytime snack, oatmeal helps lower cholesterol and reduces the risk of heart disease.

Mini Pitas with Hummus

pita-hummusUse mini pita pockets to scoop up creamy hummus. Whether you make your own hummus or choose a favorite brand at the grocery store, hummus is made from chickpeas, a great source of soluble fiber. This soluble fiber helps to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease. Pair one serving of hummus, 2 tablespoons, with 3 mini pita rounds for a 150 calorie snack. If you want a protein boost, fill the mini pita pockets with an ounce of low-sodium deli ham or turkey. The fiber and protein combo gives the snack some staying power to keep you feeling full longer.

Cooking Light

Want to step your game up? For more out of this world delicious treats…

Sandra Fisher’s Nori Rolls & dipping sauce

Sandra Fisher’s Nori Rolls & dipping sauce

*Check out Sandra’s story in Rizzilient Podcasts

My Treat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Make Vegan Avocado Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream

  • Prep Time: 15 minutes plus freezing time
  • Level of Difficulty: Easy
  • Serving Size: 4-6
  • Ingredients
  • 2 (14 ounce) cans full-fat coconut milk (refrigerated overnight)
  • 2 ripe avocados, peeled and diced
  • 5-7 tablespoons rice syrup or other sweetener
  • 1 teaspoon peppermint extract
  • A big handful of fresh mint leaves
  • 1/4 cup raw cacao nibs (or unsweetened chocolate chips or grated raw chocolate)

Directions

For the ice cream
  1. Open the coconut milk cans and scoop the thick white cream into a blender. Add the avocados, rice syrup, peppermint extract, and fresh mint and blend until smooth. Add the cacao nibs/chips and stir with a spoon.
  2. With an ice cream maker:
    Pour the mixture into your ice cream maker and prepare the ice cream according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Serve straightaway or transfer to a freezer-safe container, cover and freeze until ready to be served. Let the ice cream thaw for 10-15 minutes before serving.
  3. Without an ice cream maker:
    Pour the ice cream mixture into a freezer-safe bowl and freeze for about three hours, mixing well every 30 minutes. Scoop into bowls, serve and enjoy!

Breakfast – Lunch -Dinner

BREAKFAST BURRITO

BREAKFAST BURRITO

Breakfast Burrito

Ingredients

2 teaspoons canola oil
1/2 small red onion, diced (1 cup)
1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced
1 cup drained, rinsed canned black beans, preferably low-sodium
1/4 teaspoon chili flakes
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 eggs and 4 egg whites
1/3 cup (about 1 1/2-ounce) shredded pepper Jack cheese
Cooking spray
4 (10-inch) whole-wheat tortillas (burrito-size)
1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1/4 cup salsa
1 large tomato, (4 ounces) seeded and diced
1 small avocado (4 ounces), cubed
Hot sauce
Directions
Heat the canola oil in a large nonstick skillet over a medium-high heat. Cook the onions and peppers until onions are softened and peppers are slightly charred, about 8 minutes. Add black beans and red pepper flakes and cook until warmed through, another 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and transfer to a dish.

Whisk together the eggs and egg whites then stir in the cheese. Spray the skillet with cooking spray, and reheat the skillet over a medium heat. Reduce heat to low and add eggs, scrambling until cooked through, about 3 minutes. Spread each tortilla with 1 tablespoon each sour cream and salsa, then layer with 1/4 of the black bean mixture, 1/4 of the scrambled eggs, some diced tomato and 1/4 of the avocado. Season, to taste, with hot sauce. Roll up burrito-style and serve.

Per Serving:
Calories 460; Total Fat 20 g; (Sat Fat 6 g, Mono Fat 4 g, Poly Fat 1 g) ; Protein 23 g; Carb 51 g; Fiber 12 g; Cholesterol 235 mg; Sodium 860 mg

Excellent source of: Protein, Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C,

Good source of: Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin K, Calcium, Iodine, Iron, Potassium, Selenium

10-Minute Huevos Rancheros

Prep and Cook Time:15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 omega-3-rich eggs
  • 1/2 can black beans, drained and mashed
  • 1 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • sea salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 avocado, sliced
  • salsa from a jar, to taste
  • 3 TBS grated low-fat cheddar cheese
  • chopped cilantro, to taste
  • Optional: cayenne pepper

Directions:

  1. Poach eggs
  2. Heat beans in a skillet while eggs are cooking
  3. Remove beans from heat and mix in olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper Add a pinch of cayenne for spicy beans
  4. Place beans on plate, top with poached eggs, avocado, salsa, cheese and cilantro

Serves 1

Healthy Breakfast Frittata

Prep and Cook Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 medium onion, minced
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/4 lb ground lamb or turkey
  • 1 + 2 TBS chicken broth
  • 3 cups rinsed and finely chopped kale (stems removed)
  • 5 omega-3 enriched eggs
  • salt and black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Mince onion and chop garlic let them sit for 5 minutes to enhance their health-promoting benefits.
  2. Preheat broiler on low.
  3. Heat 1 TBS broth in a 9-10 inch stainless steel skillet. Healthy Sauté onion over medium heat, for about 3 minutes, stirring often.
  4. Add garlic, ground lamb or turkey, and cook for another 3 minutes on medium heat, breaking up clumps.
  5. Add kale and 2 TBS broth. Reduce heat to low and continue to cook covered for about 5 more minutes. Season with salt and pepper, and mix.
  6. Beat eggs, season with a pinch of salt and pepper, and pour on top of mixture evenly. Cook on low for another 2 minutes without stirring.
  7. Place skillet under broiler in middle of oven, about 7 inches from the heat source so it has time to cook without the top burning. As soon as the eggs are firm, it is done, about 2-3 minutes.

Serves 2

Healthy Breakfast Fritata
1.00 serving
281.30 grams
Calories: 294

Arugula Salad with Walnut Croutons

Prep and Cook Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 2 TBS light vinegar
  • 1 bunch arugula
  • Dressing:
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 TBS chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 1 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 2 oz gorgonzola cheese (optional)

Directions:

  1. Press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes.
  2. Slice onion thin and soak in hot water and vinegar while preparing rest of salad.
  3. Whisk together the dressing ingredients, adding olive oil at the end, a little at a time.
  4. Wash and dry arugula. Squeeze out excess liquid from onions. Combine onions and arugula and toss with dressing. Sprinkle salad with walnuts just before serving. Top with beets, cheese (optional).

Serves 2

Healthy Cooking Tips:

Make sure your arugula is young and tender as older leaves can be quite bitter.

Arugula Salad with Walnut Croutons

1.00 serving

192.28 grams

Calories: 304

Carrot Coconut Soup

Prep and Cook Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 TBS + 3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • 2 TBS fresh ginger, sliced
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 2 cups sliced carrots, about 1/4-inch thick
  • 1 cup sweet potato, cut into about 1/2-inch cubes
  • 5 oz canned coconut milk
  • salt and white pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Chop onion and let it sit for at least five minutes to bring out its hidden health benefits.
  2. Heat 1 TBS broth in a medium soup pot. Healthy Sauté onion in broth over medium heat for about 5 minutes, stirring often.
  3. Add garlic and ginger and continue to sauté for another minute.
  4. Add curry powder and mix well with onions.
  5. Add broth, carrots, and sweet potato and simmer on medium high heat until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes.
  6. Add coconut milk.
  7. Blend in batches making sure blender is not more than half full. When it’s hot, and the blender is too full, it can erupt and burn you. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  8. Return to soup pot and reheat.

Serves 4

Carrot Coconut Soup

1.00 serving

180.87 grams

Calories: 156

 

15-Minute Shrimp and Avocado Salad

Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb cooked medium sized shrimp (buy still frozen if possible for freshness), remove tails
  • 1 medium-sized tomato, seeded and chopped
  • 3 scallions, chopped
  • 1 large clove garlic, pressed
  • 2 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 1 TBS balsamic vinegar
  • 1 large firm avocado, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 TBS chopped cilantro
  • 1 TBS chopped fresh mint
  • 2 TBS chopped pumpkin seeds
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • extra virgin olive oil to taste
  • 1 head small romaine lettuce, outer leaves removed

 

Directions:

  1. Make sure shrimp is completely unfrozen if you buy it already cooked. Pat it dry with paper towels.
  2. Mix all ingredients, except lettuce, in a bowl. For optimum flavor, marinate in refrigerator for 15 minutes or more. It is still very good served right away if you don’t have the time. Serve on bed of chopped romaine lettuce.

Serves 4

Serving Suggestion: Serve with

  • Zesty Mexican Soup
  • 15 Minute Shrimp and Avocado Salad

    1.00 serving

    267.65 grams

    Calories: 265

15-Minute Maui-Style Cod

Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 lbs thick cut filets of cod
  • 1 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2TBS chicken or vegetable broth or water
  • salt and black pepper to taste
  • Salsa
  • 1 TBS minced fresh ginger
  • 1/2 cup finely minced red bell pepper
  • 3/4 cup canned crushed pineapple
  • 1 tsp finely minced jalapeno pepper (or to taste)
  • 1/2 TBS chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and white pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Mix together all ingredients for salsa and set aside.
  2. On stove top, preheat 10-12 inch stainless steel skillet on medium high heat for 2-3 minutes. Rub 1 TBS fresh lemon juice on cod and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Add broth or water to skillet and heat. Cook fish in heated skillet about 1-2 minutes on each side. Time may vary according to thickness of fish. You do not need oil or liquid for this.
  4. Remove cod from pan and top with salsa.

Serves 4

Serving Suggestions: Serve with

  • Napa Cabbage Salad
15 Minute Maui Style Snapper
1.00 serving
196.78 grams
Calories: 151

 

15-Minute Salmon with Mint Salsa

Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1/1/2 lbs salmon filets, skin and bones removed,cut into 4 pieces
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • salt and pepper
  • Salsa
  • 1 TBS finely chopped fresh mint
  • 1 TBS finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 TBS finely minced scallion
  • 1 tsp finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1 medium ripe fresh tomato, seeds and excess pulp removed, diced into ¼-inch pieces
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 3TBS fresh lemon juice
  • salt and white pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. To Quick Broil salmon: Preheat broiler on high and place an all stainless steel skillet (be sure the handle is also stainless steel) or cast iron pan under the heat for about 10 minutes to get it very hot. The pan should be 5 to 7 inches from the heat source.
  2. Chop garlic and let sit for 5-10 minutes to bring out its health-promoting properties.
  3. Rub salmon with 2 tsp fresh lemon juice, salt and pepper. (You can Quick Broil with the skin on; it just takes a minute or two longer. The skin will peel right off after cooking.)
  4. When pan is hot, use a hot pad to pull out the pan from the heat and place salmon on it, skin side down. Return to broiler. Keep in mind that it is cooking rapidly on both sides so it will be done very quickly (usually about 7 minutes for every inch of thickness). Salmon does not need to be turned. Test with a fork for doneness. It will flake easily when it is cooked. Salmon is best when it is still pink inside.
  5. Mix together salsa ingredients in a bowl, and set aside. Serve on top of Quick Broiled salmon.

Serves 4

15 Minute Salmon with Mint Salsa

1.00 serving

234.15 grams

Calories: 387

 

 

 

Therapy

8 Natural Remedies for Joint Pain

By: Organic Authority 

Aches, pains, and joint stiffness. They come not only with age, but also with arthritis, lupus and other chronic ailments. While many people find help from pain relieving drugs like ibuprofen, naproxen, and other anti-inflammatory medicines, those medicines can be harsh on your body.

Using natural treatments for joint pain and stiffness can make a big difference in the amount of medication you need to take. We’ve outlined some great herbal and homeopathic remedies to relieve stiffness and pain.

Herbal remedies, healthy foods, and exercise are all great ways to help relieve joint pain and stiffness. While it’s important to check with your physician before adding herbs to your existing medications, the herbs listed in this article may help you decrease the amount of prescription medicine you are taking. This in turn can help ease stomach issues and lessen the chances of these medications affecting your liver.

1. Cayenne

Known for its spicy-hot taste, cayenne makes an excellent topical ointment that relieves joint pain. Rubbing cayenne on the affected area causes a mild irritation, which in turn “distracts” the nerves from the more severe joint pain. Repeated topical applications of cayenne pepper can reduce arthritis pain significantly.

To make a topical paste, mix 2 tablespoons of cayenne pepper with 1/2 cup of cocoa butter, lanolin, or coconut oil. Apply it directly to the sore joint. You can also mix 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper with 1 cup of apple cider vinegar and soak sore hands or feet for 20 minutes to reduce pain and inflammation.

2. Fruit Pectin & Grape Juice       

The combination of pectin, which is found in the cells of many plants, and grape juice can be of great use to people suffering from inflammation and joint pain. Grape juice is loaded with antioxidants, among them, anthocyanins, which are noted for their effect on reducing inflammation. Pectin is also believed to relieve fluid buildup in the joints of arthritis sufferers.

It’s best to purchase pectin from a health or natural foods store for the best quality. You want to make sure to select pectin that is free of MSG and other additives.

Mix 1/2 cup of grape juice with 2 tablespoons pectin. You can add water, if needed. Drink it twice daily for 6 weeks, and then reduce the frequency as symptoms disappear.

3. Licorice              

Licorice acts much like your body’s own natural corticosteroids, which reduce inflammation. It also decreases free radicals at the site of inflammation and inhibits the enzyme production that’s involved in the inflammatory process. The key component in licorice, which blocks and relieves inflammation, is called glycyrrhizin. It supports the body’s release of cortisol, which suppresses the immune system and eases pain and frequency of arthritis flare-ups.

Licorice comes in a variety of teas, tinctures, or in supplement form. It’s important to note that licorice is not for everyone. People with blood pressure issues should avoid the herb altogether.

4. Flaxseed             

Omega-3s are important for a strong immune system, but did you know they also help fight inflammation? Flaxseed is one of the best vegan sources of Omega-3 fatty acids, which makes it even more important for arthritis sufferers. Animal fats can often lead to more inflammation, so making the choice to incorporate flaxseed into your diet will help you get the important Omega-3s without adding the animal fat.

Try to include two tablespoons of flaxseeds or flaxseed oil in your daily diet. You can add ground flax to cereals, yogurt, and even sauces and stews.

5. Stinging Nettle         

Don’t let the name scare you, nettles are contain protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, beta-carotene, along with vitamins A,C, D, and B complex, all in a form that is easy for the body to use. It is also a terrific herbal remedy for all types of arthritis and gout.

The stinging nettle plant has fine hairs on its heart-shaped leaves and stems that are irritating to the skin. Although the hairs of stinging nettle are usually painful to the touch, when placed over a painful area of the body they serve to reduce pain, either by decreasing inflammatory chemicals or by interfering with the transmission of pain signals.

Nettles also have minerals including boron, calcium, magnesium and silicon, which ease pain while helping to build strong bones.

Stinging nettle is available in several forms including teas, capsules, tinctures, extracts, or whole leaf. Recommended dosage for capsule form is up to 1,300 mg/daily. Whole leaves can be applied directly to the painful area of the skin.

6. Turmeric, Ginger and Bromelain

Turmeric, ginger, and bromelain are all effective and natural treatments to relieve stiffness, swelling, and joint pain on their own. But in combination, these three substances each boost the other’s effectiveness. Take these in combination on an empty stomach twice a day for pain relief. All three substances can thin the blood, so those taking blood thinning medicine should first check with their health practitioners.

7. Get Moving

Light weight training and cardiovascular exercise are very important to relieve joint stiffness and pain. While the first thing you may want to do is curl up and lay down when joint pain strikes, it’s a great idea to get up and get moving. I find that a hot shower and some gentle exericise like yoga, Pilates, or light weight training really helps get your joints in motion and reduces the stiffness and pain. Light weight training can also strength the muscles surrounding your affected joint, thus providing it with more support.

Another great form of exercise to get relieve joint pain and stiffness is aquatic exercise. This non-impact workout allows you to slowly moving your joins through their range of motion.

8. Stock Up Anti-Inflammatory Foods

There are a number of foods that can reduce inflammation and swelling, which causes much of the pain associated with osteoarthritis. Foods like nuts and fatty fish, like salmon are loaded with Omega-3s, that will help fight inflammation. Other great sources of anti-inflammatory foods include blueberries, kelp, horseradish, mustard, garlic, onions, watercress, parsley, celery, pickles, lemon, and rose-hip tea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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D.I.Y/D.Y.K

_______________________________________________________________________

 Did you know you can reverse cavities naturally? Just add these natural ingredients together, and brush after with a natural toothpaste.

-Coconut oil attacks the harmfuk bacteria in your mouth. It can reduce plaque buildup, prevent tooth decay, and fight gum disease.

-Tumeric is most commonly recommended for its anti-inflammatory properties. Several studies have evaluated the effectiveness of tumeric in controlling gingival inflammation. Plus it helps whiten your teeth naturally.

-Clove oil is good for toothache pain, its the eugenol(an ingredient within clove oil) that provides relief.

-Eugenol is natural anesthetic and antibacterial, and it works well at reducing inflammation in the mouth.

Prepartion

Take 1/4 teaspoon of tumeric powder, 1/4 teaspoon of coconut oil, 2 drops of essential clove oil, & a pinch of sea salt.

Instructions

Mix all the ingredients in a small bowl. Then, apply the paste on a toothbrush and brush your teeth with it. Let the paste stay on your teeth for at least 2 minutes to work, then brush your teeth(w/natural toothpaste), and rinse with water.

For tips and tricks on keeping your breath fresh all day, check out this e-book

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 CHEAP ORGANIC FOODS YOU MUST BUY

10 CHEAP ORGANIC FOODS YOU MUST BUY

Compared to non-organic, there are certain organic foods that are so affordable that you’d be a little crazy to ignore them while grocery shopping.

File this under Not-So-Fun Facts: You’re typically exposed to at least 10 pesticides on a daily basis, according to the USDA’s Pesticide Data Program. And when it comes to eating clean, you probably slip more organic foods into your diet to avoid those icky residues (and to help that whole sustainability thing).

But let’s be honest; even though we know organic food is better for us and the environment, the sticker prices can be pretty high at times. This is not an argument about how you must always buy organic, nor is it a list of which foods you should buy organic no matter what; it’s about what’s so affordable that there’s really no excuse. Read on for the 17 organic foods that are weight-loss friendly foods and give you the most bang for your buck.

by Perri O. Blumberg

Beans

Beans, beans, they’re good for your…wallet.Fiber-rich and wallet friendly, organic beans are well-worth stocking up on for only a few cents more than conventional ones. A can of organic chickpeas, for instance, might set you back $1.39 instead of the $1.09 conventional would cost. If you look for organic beans in the bulk bins, you may find even better deals—and you won’t have to worry about contamination from cans. (Always look for BPA-free cans!)

Tea

Whether you rely on it for its fat-burning prowess or enjoy it for its caffeine jolt, the organic varietals of tea are worth the extra pennies and even cheaper if you buy loose varieties in bulk. “Sampling done by the FDA shows that imported tea contains illegal levels of pesticide residues 26.7 percent of the time,” offers nutritionist Kayleen St.John, RD, at Natural Gourmet Institute in New York City. “But organic tea is not produced with synthetic pesticides and poses less of a health risk.”

Corn Tortillas

Mexican night? Don’t mind if we do. “While sweet corn on the cob is traditionally considered to be safe, corn [used] in food products, also known as ‘field corn,’ is largely GMO,” says nutritionist Lisa Hayim, MS, RD, and founder of The WellNecessities. In fact, nearly 90 percent of corn in America is genetically modified. “Instead, opt for organic corn tortillas. I love Food for Life’s Ezekiel tortillas or Whole Foods 365 Organic Tortillas,” adds Hayim.

Organic Frozen Fruit

Organic frozen fruit lasts from 6 to 12 months (peace out, rotten banana syndrome), is convenient when a fruit is out of season and is more affordable than fresh organic fruit. “Organic store-brand frozen fruit can be a great option because they have to meet the same criteria as brand names to get the ‘organic’ label. With frozen fruit, you can purchase these labels and save on your daily smoothies, plus you save even more when you don’t have to throw away fruit that’s gone bad.

Potatoes

Wildly versatile and incredibly affordable (a few pounds shouldn’t cost more than $10), potatoes can also last a few weeks, so you don’t have to worry about cooking them right away. And serious “Ugh!” alert: “A study reported by the Environmental Work Group—the organization that puts out the ‘Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen’—found that the average potato had more pesticides by weight than any other produce.

Spices

Dried herbs and spices aren’t that expensive to begin with, and are worth forking over a little bit extra to get the organic ones to avoid scary pesticides. An effortless way to make dishes more flavorful, the non-organic varieties are irradiated (definition: exposed to radiation), which zaps them of their health-supportive properties.

Apples

“Not all produce is grown equally; some fruits and vegetables are more likely to have pesticide residues,” cautions St. John. “The Environmental Working Group has a ‘Dirty Dozen’ list to help consumers identify high-risk produce. Apples are at the top of the list but, the good news is, their organic counterparts are relatively easy to find and not terribly expensive,” she adds. Grab a two or five-pound bag to enhance your savings if you have a larger family.

Organic Soups

“With organic soups, you get a lot of bang for your buck, especially if you know where to shop! For example, on a given week, Amy’s Organic Soups could be $2.42 at Walmart, compared to $3.69 at regular grocery stores,” says Pavini. “A bonus? You can use organic soup to cook other dishes, giving even slow-cooker recipes and casseroles a tasty kick,” Pavini continues.

Olive Oil

Sure, it might cost you between $10-20, but it’s mere cents when you consider the number of servings or uses in a bottle. “By buying organic olive oils, which are mechanically-pressed, you avoid oils that use chemical solvents for extraction,” St. John says. “And given olive oil’s versatility, you might consume multiple servings per day, like in a baked good, salad dressing, or roasted anything.”

Soy Products

“When buying soy, or a soy product, opt for organic since 90 percent of soy production is genetically modified,” cautions Hayim. For the best deals, look for house-brand tofu, or check the frozen aisle for organic, frozen edamame, which stay good for a long time and are great in stir fries and for snacks. “Remember to look at soy milk, tofu, soy beans (edamame), miso paste, and tempeh [all of which fall into the soy family],” advises Hayim.